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Be-Side

The Home of Hakm's B-Side e-alter ego...his auxiliary brain or external hard drive...

It is a distinct honor to represent the city I now call “HOME” in my hometown paper! Humbled, that a readership of 70,000 in the Philadelphia/South Jersey area is proud of how I serve community 2,000 miles away. Thank you Kim Mulford, the City of Albuquerque, my parents, the Albuquerque Poet Laureate Program, and the Courier Post! Read the article here. 

It is a distinct honor to represent the city I now call “HOME” in my hometown paper! Humbled, that a readership of 70,000 in the Philadelphia/South Jersey area is proud of how I serve community 2,000 miles away. Thank you Kim Mulford, the City of Albuquerque, my parents, the Albuquerque Poet Laureate Program, and the Courier Post! Read the article here

The official poem commissioned by the City of Albuquerque for the New Mexico Centennial Celebration, delivered on the Main Stage at the Summerfest Centennial Celebration on June 16th, 2012 before Los Lobos and after Robert Mirabal.


To: New Mexico

From: Hakim Bellamy

100 Years of Corridos: A song for the New Mexico Centennial

 

In the 1st chapter

Of the Gospel

According to Anaya

 

Rudolfo writes

“All of the older people spoke only Spanish,

And I myself understood only Spanish.”

In English

 

Bienvenidos Albuquerque

I myself

Understand only English

In Dine

 

We speak many languages

But mean the same thing

And manana

Will be more of the same

 

Familia

Food

Fiesta

Forever

 

Come on and sing along

 

We’re going to

Familia

Comida

Fiesta

Forever

 

For 100 years B.C.

Before the Commodores

Before Lionel Ritchie

And for a 100 years more

 

We’ve farmed

Feasted and fixed cars

 

We’ve moved people

And mixed razas

 

We’ve got an appointment

With the curandera

 

As soon as we leave the doctors

 

A lust for livestock

Like chupacabras

 

Afraid of God

And the inexplicable

 

Dinosaur fossils

 

So in love with space

And the people who live there

That we speak Chewbacca

 

The 47th state

Admitted to the Union

We might as well have been The Moon

…of Endor

To our forefathers

 

With the oldest

And highest

State capital in the country

People on both coasts

Should look up to us

Instead of wondering

If they have to exchange their money

Before coming

 

Yes,

Dollars is our official currency too

And though

We don’t have much of it

 

Money can’t buy cultura

 

Our History Book

The King Alfonso Version

Is a canon

Of wars and peace

 

A Bible

Of you and me

That was written in Madrid

By missionaries and mestizos

 

We are men of magic

And women of wizardry

Who speak in spell and song

Wing words

And fly them like a flag

 

All yellow

Between red and green

Like a traffic light

 

Like the state question is

Hurry up

Or slow down

Never stop

 

All of the older people sung only corridos

However,

In those corridos…

Me?

I only heard gospel

 

Maybe it’s me

Maybe it’s a stage

 

But every time

I hear the clap of thunder

It sounds like a blessing

 

Every time

I hear the pitter, patter

Of the rain

 

It sounds

Like a round

Of applause

 

And even the monsoon roars

“Encore”

And the flash bloods

Flood

Our hearts

With love

 

One hundred

New Year’s Eves

Of trying to puncture precipitation

 

Where the sky never dies

And the clouds wear bulletproof vests

 

Where we perpetually live

In the shadow of a hot air balloon eclipse

 

We are not a city

That speaks “Good Morning”

We are a city that speaks

Mass Ascension

 

Like Grandpa

Only spoke Spanish

While he was drinking

 

Buenos Dias

 

Like Grandma

Only spoke Latin

When she was praying

 

Buenas Noches

 

Where water

Is so sacred and scarce

That we pot it

In puddles

On our flat roofs

 

Pool it

In vestibule stoups

Of steepled temples

Where pigeons swirl and roost

 

Pond it

In mountaintops

On our not-so-flat horizons

We bottle it

In our bodies

And set fire to it

In our forests

 

Where it sounds like

Acequias babble “amen”

And bosques

Smell like baptisms

 

Where the rain

Doesn’t speak any language

It only understands dance

 

And sometimes

We miss it so much

We need TWO rainbows

To promise us

It is coming back

 

After thousands of years

Of owners

For this little piece of hacienda

 

It’s been us as tenants

Together

Roommates for the past hundred

 

Call it a trust

Call it a Zia-shaped symbol for eternity

Over our right ring finger

 

Call it the interconnectedness of cultures

Call it married to each other

 

Speak now or forever hold your “chisme”

 

We are

Actions speak louder than wordsmiths

Storytelling rituals

 

We don’t speak Project Runway

We Cowboy Cosmopolitan

Urban Traditional

 

Where our children

Dare not say or see

Cucui or La llorona

But are lucky

Santa speaks Spanglish

And has a sweet tooth

For leche y biscochitos

 

Where birthdays

Are miracles

And each one

Has a spirit

Holy Spirit

Or patron saint

 

Where we celebrate

100

Today

 

In the beginning

The Greatest Spirit

Created America

And the earth

 

And it was

Bueno

 

I don’t speak perfect English

Barely even speak passable Spanish

 

But it’s okay

 

Because there is no such thing

As “perfect English”

Except for the word

Nuevo Mexico

 

© Hakim Bellamy June 12, 2012


Warehouse 508 hosts Centennial Celebration for Youth
Hip Hop benefit celebrates 100 years of youth culture in Albuquerque

Albuquerque, NM – In all one hundred years of Albuquerque’s existence, citizens under the age of 21 have been present.  From pushing agricultural plows to pushing buttons on smartphones, youth have been a critical and contested part of Albuquerque’s growth. At times, the youth culture in the Duke City has been both disdained for “loiterboarding” (loitering and skateboarding in public spaces) and desired to attract parents that are attached to commerce that would create economic development. In this context, local visionaries and a Bay Area hip hop artist have decided to include a “tween” demographic in the hundred-year party, on their own terms.

At 8pm on Saturday, June 16th, Warehouse 508 will host the “Be the Change” Tour featuring San Francisco based hip hop activist Dregs-One. Also traveling with Dregs-One from the Bay, are hip hop artists L-roneous, Patience & DJ Beats Me. Albuquerque-based, multimedia hip hop theater troupe, Urban Verbs, will open for the Bay Area contingent at the benefit designed to raise funds for youth arts programming in Albuquerque.

According to Dregs One website:

“Hip hop started out as a way to organize and uplift the community – with a mixture of civil rights and creative expression, Dregs One is an artist who is doing just that. And as an influential emcee/producer and a community organizer in the movement, he ‘can’t help but be aware.’”
 
With a passion for justice and a dedication to rapping about issues that plague inner-city youth like homelessness, drug use and violence while sampling artists such as Sade and the Doors, Dregs One is changing the world with his mic and turntables. So much so, that Dregs is donating his performance in Albuquerque so the entire $8 cover goes towards reaching the $2000 goal that nonprofit Warehouse 508 hopes to raise in order to increase their youth programming in the city. The enterprising activist has even started a Kickstarter to raise his own travel/lodging funds for the Southwest tour that includes a benefit for the Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development in Tempe, AZ.
 
From his interview freestyle featured on Feministing to his “Wake Up Report” documentary on community issues, Dregs One aims to inspire Albuquerque youth to “vote with their feet” and pack this event that will send a message to Albuquerque. “Young people have been in Albuquerque for one hundred years,” says event organizer Hakim Bellamy. “Young people will be here for one hundred more, so we need to make sure their social and cultural needs are met.”
 
Pre-sale tickets for this all-ages show can be purchased at www.warehouse508.org. This event is made possible by support from McCune Charitable Foundation, the Lumpkin Family Foundation, American General Media, the Local-iQ and the Weekly Alibi.


You can share the Facebook Event here: http://www.facebook.com/events/242513005857282/

Warehouse 508 hosts Centennial Celebration for Youth

Hip Hop benefit celebrates 100 years of youth culture in Albuquerque

Albuquerque, NM – In all one hundred years of Albuquerque’s existence, citizens under the age of 21 have been present.  From pushing agricultural plows to pushing buttons on smartphones, youth have been a critical and contested part of Albuquerque’s growth. At times, the youth culture in the Duke City has been both disdained for “loiterboarding” (loitering and skateboarding in public spaces) and desired to attract parents that are attached to commerce that would create economic development. In this context, local visionaries and a Bay Area hip hop artist have decided to include a “tween” demographic in the hundred-year party, on their own terms.

At 8pm on Saturday, June 16th, Warehouse 508 will host the “Be the Change” Tour featuring San Francisco based hip hop activist Dregs-One. Also traveling with Dregs-One from the Bay, are hip hop artists L-roneous, Patience & DJ Beats Me. Albuquerque-based, multimedia hip hop theater troupe, Urban Verbs, will open for the Bay Area contingent at the benefit designed to raise funds for youth arts programming in Albuquerque.

According to Dregs One website:

“Hip hop started out as a way to organize and uplift the community – with a mixture of civil rights and creative expression, Dregs One is an artist who is doing just that. And as an influential emcee/producer and a community organizer in the movement, he ‘can’t help but be aware.’”

 

With a passion for justice and a dedication to rapping about issues that plague inner-city youth like homelessness, drug use and violence while sampling artists such as Sade and the Doors, Dregs One is changing the world with his mic and turntables. So much so, that Dregs is donating his performance in Albuquerque so the entire $8 cover goes towards reaching the $2000 goal that nonprofit Warehouse 508 hopes to raise in order to increase their youth programming in the city. The enterprising activist has even started a Kickstarter to raise his own travel/lodging funds for the Southwest tour that includes a benefit for the Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development in Tempe, AZ.

 

From his interview freestyle featured on Feministing to his “Wake Up Report” documentary on community issues, Dregs One aims to inspire Albuquerque youth to “vote with their feet” and pack this event that will send a message to Albuquerque. “Young people have been in Albuquerque for one hundred years,” says event organizer Hakim Bellamy. “Young people will be here for one hundred more, so we need to make sure their social and cultural needs are met.”

 

Pre-sale tickets for this all-ages show can be purchased at www.warehouse508.org. This event is made possible by support from McCune Charitable Foundation, the Lumpkin Family Foundation, American General Media, the Local-iQ and the Weekly Alibi.


You can share the Facebook Event here: http://www.facebook.com/events/242513005857282/

Poem written for Albuquerque Poet Laureate Program Interview Segment

“Glory is not a conceit. It is not a decoration for valor.

Glory belongs to the act of being constant to something greater than yourself

To a cause, to your principles

To the people on whom you rely

And who rely on you in return.”

-Senator John McCain

 

 

Hero (for Poet Laureate of Albuquerque)

 

I’ve heard of God

Washing feet

But never writing poems

Even the Bible

Was written by man

 

God?

Was more of a performance poet

More about people

Than paper

More about practice

Than pens

 

And though God gets angry

And sometimes screams

She’s no slam poet

Not so big on ego

 

So in love

with nature

(And it’s androgynous qualities)

That Apollo found laurel’s sacred

And fashioned them into crowns

To king the meek

 

Poets & Heroes

 

Laureate means glory

We be the dispatches

That announce the victory

 

We be beyond

The Parliamentary Poet Laureate

Of Canada

With alternating terms in two languages

 

We before

We be

Four

Officially recognized languages

English, Spanish

AND Spanglish

 

Plus we speak

Sheet music

 

Written for the

Conquistadores’ trumpet

Before the conquest

 

Conjure constructs

As though our words

Carry the DNA

Of La Raza Cosmica

 

Our tongues

Should tie people together

Like the rope

Of Pope

Cause the revolution’s

Inside of us

 

But most of all

We have to meet two requirements

To be servants

And to be continually inspired

 

The people will admire

Us finding it

 

And in refinding it

            And refinding it

 

And we’ll feel like a hero

Every time we write it

 

But it is us

Not the writing

That we should be striving

For them to admire

 

But alas

Every laureate will strive

To satisfy

The Roman Philosopher

Inside of us

 

As Pliny the Elder said

True glory

Consists in doing

What deserves to be written

In writing what deserves to be read

 

Hakim Bellamy February 22, 2012

The Albuquerque Poet Laureate Program is sponsored by Escuela del Sol Montessori,
a 501(c)(3) organization in Albuquerque, NM.

Your donation is tax deductable.
All Donors of $50 or over in 2011 will be listed as a Founding Sponsor/Collaborator.

We are hanging “A Good Place to Stumble  Upon” show this Saturday. We received poems from well known poets,  hobbyists, elementary students and volunteers. Each haiku is an image  which samples the unique attributes of a time and place. Written by a  calligrapher and decorated with water color, these poems are perfectly  simple. On display March – April 30th with an Opening Reception, Sunday  March 27th, 3:00 – 5:00 pm.
This is exhibit is open NOW as of March 5th, but the opening reception is on March 27th from 3 to 5 p.m.Hosted by: The Open Space Visitor CenterWhat:  Juried  Haiku and Senryu rewritten by a calligrapher onto 16X20 size  paper and decorated with an abstract watercolor on display in a gallery  settingWhere: Open Space Visitor Center, 6500 Coors Blvd., NW(Between Montaño & Paseo del Norte at Bosque Meadows Rd.)505-897-8831When:  March – April 30th
Contact: Joshua Willis, Parks &  Recreation Dept., Open Space Division, 505-897-8856, jrwillis at cabq dot gov  or Gina Marselle at ginamwrites at aol dot com
Link to Facebook Page for the exhibit:
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=155426901180713

We are hanging “A Good Place to Stumble Upon” show this Saturday. We received poems from well known poets, hobbyists, elementary students and volunteers. Each haiku is an image which samples the unique attributes of a time and place. Written by a calligrapher and decorated with water color, these poems are perfectly simple. On display March – April 30th with an Opening Reception, Sunday March 27th, 3:00 – 5:00 pm.

This is exhibit is open NOW as of March 5th, but the opening reception is on March 27th from 3 to 5 p.m.

Hosted by: The Open Space Visitor Center

What: Juried Haiku and Senryu rewritten by a calligrapher onto 16X20 size paper and decorated with an abstract watercolor on display in a gallery setting

Where: Open Space Visitor Center, 6500 Coors Blvd., NW
(Between Montaño & Paseo del Norte at Bosque Meadows Rd.)
505-897-8831

When: March – April 30th

Contact: Joshua Willis, Parks & Recreation Dept., Open Space Division, 505-897-8856, jrwillis at cabq dot gov or Gina Marselle at ginamwrites at aol dot com

Link to Facebook Page for the exhibit:

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=155426901180713