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Be-Side

The Home of Hakm's B-Side e-alter ego...his auxiliary brain or external hard drive...

My thoughts for today…
And my thoughts from yesterday (re-posted from Facebook):
So, I’m not at the rally right now, I’m at rehearsal. Maybe because cops and civilians have gotten away with extreme and unnecessary force on Black people for years. Call me a little desensitized even… But I do have these thoughts. When one Black person is engaged in a criminal act, ALL Black people become criminal by default in the eye of the non-Black public. It’s how institutional racism perverts a person’s sense of perception. But when one (or five) police officers gun down a sick, homeless person because they are essentially “afraid” of him and his pocket knife…while they are armed to the teeth (or their dog’s teeth). But then, folks whose interests are in bed with police officers (pun intended) hide behind radio call in shows and social media pages come to the defense of cops, because not ALL cops are bad cops. All I have to say to that is THIS is how institutional corruption perverts a person’s (this persons) sense of perception…by default. Do I believe in good cops, sure. I’ve met one or two in my lifetime, if there are SO many more of them, then I think there’d be a lil’ bit more whistleblowing than sirens blaring from the boys in blue. #OneBadAppleSpoilsTheAPD #AndThereIsWAYMoreThanOne
#meThinks

My thoughts for today…

And my thoughts from yesterday (re-posted from Facebook):

So, I’m not at the rally right now, I’m at rehearsal. Maybe because cops and civilians have gotten away with extreme and unnecessary force on Black people for years. Call me a little desensitized even…

But I do have these thoughts. When one Black person is engaged in a criminal act, ALL Black people become criminal by default in the eye of the non-Black public. It’s how institutional racism perverts a person’s sense of perception. But when one (or five) police officers gun down a sick, homeless person because they are essentially “afraid” of him and his pocket knife…while they are armed to the teeth (or their dog’s teeth). But then, folks whose interests are in bed with police officers (pun intended) hide behind radio call in shows and social media pages come to the defense of cops, because not ALL cops are bad cops. All I have to say to that is THIS is how institutional corruption perverts a person’s (this persons) sense of perception…by default. Do I believe in good cops, sure. I’ve met one or two in my lifetime, if there are SO many more of them, then I think there’d be a lil’ bit more whistleblowing than sirens blaring from the boys in blue. #OneBadAppleSpoilsTheAPD #AndThereIsWAYMoreThanOne

#meThinks

So…I get asked to write a poem for the student body at Piñon Elementary School in Santa Fe for their Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on Friday, January 17th. I say yes…namely because I like little people and I like Dr. King. So, I begin investigating angles with which to approach Dr. King’s life that would make for a “good” poem for elementary school age students.

Mind you, I still had to come up with another Dr. King poem for my 6th straight year as part of the Amy Biehl High School Day of Service (in line with the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. National Day of Service initiative). That poem would need to be on its feet, so to speak, by Monday, January 20th. More in that later…
So after weeks of not liking anything I came up with, I had an epiphany on the treadmill at the gym. What if I write a poem about Dr. King as a youth? THEN, I thought what if I even addressed it to an 8 year-old Dr. King? THEN, I thought what if I addressed it to Dr. King at different ages, because we are all every age of every year we’ve lived at the same time like that poem Sandra Cisneros, Eleven?

I finally had an approach, so I began writing. And the poem started pouring out in chunks…but the more it grew…the more I knew it would not be appropriate (read: allowed) in an elementary school setting (read: I wouldn’t be ALLOWED to come back!). The poem was EXTREMELY political…like Dr. King and I…and some of the things I was talking about (like suicide attempts, terrorism, four-letter words and infidelity) weren’t pretty. So, of course, I finished the poem. Who am I to try and stop the muse when the faucet is on?

What I then decided to do was lift pieces out of this new poem that were suitable for younger audiences, and used those pieces as the foundation of a “separate but gentler” piece. The result was Ageless (written for Amy Biehl High School in Albuquerque) and Junior (written for Piñon Elementary School).
Please take a moment to read and/or listen to them below.
They are siblings of sorts.

Ageless http://hakimbe.bandcamp.com/track/ageless 

Junior http://hakimbe.bandcamp.com/track/junior

So…I get asked to write a poem for the student body at Piñon Elementary School in Santa Fe for their Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on Friday, January 17th. I say yes…namely because I like little people and I like Dr. King. So, I begin investigating angles with which to approach Dr. King’s life that would make for a “good” poem for elementary school age students.

Mind you, I still had to come up with another Dr. King poem for my 6th straight year as part of the Amy Biehl High School Day of Service (in line with the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. National Day of Service initiative). That poem would need to be on its feet, so to speak, by Monday, January 20th. More in that later…

So after weeks of not liking anything I came up with, I had an epiphany on the treadmill at the gym. What if I write a poem about Dr. King as a youth? THEN, I thought what if I even addressed it to an 8 year-old Dr. King? THEN, I thought what if I addressed it to Dr. King at different ages, because we are all every age of every year we’ve lived at the same time like that poem Sandra Cisneros, Eleven?

I finally had an approach, so I began writing. And the poem started pouring out in chunks…but the more it grew…the more I knew it would not be appropriate (read: allowed) in an elementary school setting (read: I wouldn’t be ALLOWED to come back!). The poem was EXTREMELY political…like Dr. King and I…and some of the things I was talking about (like suicide attempts, terrorism, four-letter words and infidelity) weren’t pretty. So, of course, I finished the poem. Who am I to try and stop the muse when the faucet is on?

What I then decided to do was lift pieces out of this new poem that were suitable for younger audiences, and used those pieces as the foundation of a “separate but gentler” piece. The result was Ageless (written for Amy Biehl High School in Albuquerque) and Junior (written for Piñon Elementary School).

Please take a moment to read and/or listen to them below.

They are siblings of sorts.

Ageless http://hakimbe.bandcamp.com/track/ageless

Junior http://hakimbe.bandcamp.com/track/junior

I’m headed back to Central New Mexico Community College to present the Graduation Commencement Address. I am honored to be asked to part of such a memorable day for these graduates. Join me in congratulating them on this milestone. Check out the fill article here.

I’m headed back to Central New Mexico Community College to present the Graduation Commencement Address. I am honored to be asked to part of such a memorable day for these graduates. Join me in congratulating them on this milestone. Check out the fill article here.

"Seven syllables short of a haiku…"
-

My most favorite Six-Word Memoir to date! I came up with this one yesterday while I was sitting in traffic (and running late) for my three class, guest instructor visit at New Mexico School for the Arts. A haiku/senryu is 17 syllables…this Six-Word Memoir is 10 syllables…7 short of a picnic…like me…if you know what I mean.

#OneFlewOverTheCuckoosNest (A “found poem” and “found Six-Word Memoir by they way! I can’t claim authorship of this one though.) ;(

Check out my Six-Word Memoir published here. Then, submit your own!

For “Nikki”… by hakim bellamy

 

i.

 

I feel like you’ve always been mine

though you’ve been proclaiming emancipation since before

since before we was slave or citizen

since we was love and laughter and light

we don’t own each other no mo’

some stopped saving one another too

 

but you

have turned borders into water

language into papers

 

death into understanding

and day-to-day into magic

 

does being a sHE-RO ever get old?

or just old-fashioned?

 

ii.

 

Some people want to be like you when they grow up

I want to be like you NOW

 

Edward, son of Edward Frederick, they call me Hakim

 

Yolande Cornelia Jr.

they call you Nikki

 

third sign of the Zodiac

they call us talkers

 

we come from East Coast and Appalachia

Philadelphia to Tennessee and Black

 

back and forth

blonde and ‘fro

 

we come from Black People

Black Churches and Black-Eyed Peas, sista

 

poets and not quite poets

if you ask Ivory Tower

instead of Ivory Coast,

but who asked them anyway?

 

for the record,

I too, prefer my wine…red

 

iii.

 

When I heard the news

I thought of you

 

I had a few friends that went to Virginia Tech

none at that time

at that time

you were the only person I knew, but did not know

that went there

 

I think about the sanctuary of the sentence

where we sometimes hide

sometimes say come and get me

I think about how schoolhouses

ain’t never been safe in the South

I think about how everywhere is the South

 

and though hip hop is the new underground

your words have always been a railroad

 

WE ARE VIRGINIA TECH

 

iv.

Do you ever get tired of fighting fire with paper?

this many books in,

do you still feel like people misread you?

will you figure out a way

to bottle “relevance” and sell it to the next generation of Giovanni’s?

will you blueprint your survival of America,

cancer and Black womanhood…

 

or is it already embedded in the hieroglyphs

of your “codexes”

 

do your codices, code exist?

how do you commit our existence to script

with such vivid depiction?

 

and I know you been chasing her

like an old game of tag

maybe even laid an index finger on her once

or twice

but next time you get close enough to Utopia

close enough to smell her hair

you tell her I am looking for her…please

 

v.

They will call you distinguished, Professor

activist, human or civil

 

they will call you an American writer

or an African American writer

 

a great poet

or a great Black poet

 

never both

when you are both

and more

 

but a wise person once said,

“Once you know who you are,

you don’t have to worry anymore.”

 

© Hakim Bellamy November 2, 2013


The above poem was written for and delivered to Dr. Nikki Giovanni at her Chasing Utopia book tour stop in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Read my Local iQ review of her new book here.

For “Nikki”… by hakim bellamy

 

i.

 

I feel like you’ve always been mine

though you’ve been proclaiming emancipation since before

since before we was slave or citizen

since we was love and laughter and light

we don’t own each other no mo’

some stopped saving one another too

 

but you

have turned borders into water

language into papers

 

death into understanding

and day-to-day into magic

 

does being a sHE-RO ever get old?

or just old-fashioned?

 

ii.

 

Some people want to be like you when they grow up

I want to be like you NOW

 

Edward, son of Edward Frederick, they call me Hakim

 

Yolande Cornelia Jr.

they call you Nikki

 

third sign of the Zodiac

they call us talkers

 

we come from East Coast and Appalachia

Philadelphia to Tennessee and Black

 

back and forth

blonde and ‘fro

 

we come from Black People

Black Churches and Black-Eyed Peas, sista

 

poets and not quite poets

if you ask Ivory Tower

instead of Ivory Coast,

but who asked them anyway?

 

for the record,

I too, prefer my wine…red

 

iii.

 

When I heard the news

I thought of you

 

I had a few friends that went to Virginia Tech

none at that time

at that time

you were the only person I knew, but did not know

that went there

 

I think about the sanctuary of the sentence

where we sometimes hide

sometimes say come and get me

I think about how schoolhouses

ain’t never been safe in the South

I think about how everywhere is the South

 

and though hip hop is the new underground

your words have always been a railroad

 

WE ARE VIRGINIA TECH

 

iv.

Do you ever get tired of fighting fire with paper?

this many books in,

do you still feel like people misread you?

will you figure out a way

to bottle “relevance” and sell it to the next generation of Giovanni’s?

will you blueprint your survival of America,

cancer and Black womanhood…

 

or is it already embedded in the hieroglyphs

of your “codexes”

 

do your codices, code exist?

how do you commit our existence to script

with such vivid depiction?

 

and I know you been chasing her

like an old game of tag

maybe even laid an index finger on her once

or twice

but next time you get close enough to Utopia

close enough to smell her hair

you tell her I am looking for her…please

 

v.

They will call you distinguished, Professor

activist, human or civil

 

they will call you an American writer

or an African American writer

 

a great poet

or a great Black poet

 

never both

when you are both

and more

 

but a wise person once said,

“Once you know who you are,

you don’t have to worry anymore.”

 

© Hakim Bellamy November 2, 2013

The above poem was written for and delivered to Dr. Nikki Giovanni at her Chasing Utopia book tour stop in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Read my Local iQ review of her new book here.

The Fire Next Time (written for Notzozobra 2013)

The first time

I got kicked out of high school

was before I was in high school

 

the guidance office was connected to the nurse’s office

and my friend’s mom was a guidance counselor

 

thanks to her secondhand nepotism

we got to train with the high school track team before

we were in high school

 

track practice started after school

after high school which dismissed at 3:15

while middle was out at 2:30

 

so we chilled in the guidance office

underneath the bridged gap in adult supervision

which was connected to the nurse’s office

nothing but time idling on our hands

 

in the nurse’s workshop

there was an apple

that we were not supposed to Eden

in every single drawer

 

upon breaking the first seal

we scored a pack of matches

the origami sailboat we floated in flames on a lake of bathroom sink

looked more like a fucked up hat…

but burned glorious for 7.2 seconds

and approximately 7.2 minutes later we heard sirens

needless to say I didn’t see the outside of my bedroom for about 7.2 years

 

but every time I see a flame

it reminds me that I have been in love with fire since I could spell “spontaneous combustion”

 

I’m almost certain, cavemen considered it the first reality show

a marathon of stories, sparks and fireworks

long before Netflix was a figment of our mail order imaginations

 

before the Pueblo Revolt was unsuccessful, then successful, then unsuccessful again

before the Spanish returned

before fiestas

before tourists, and tickets, and gunshots that can be heard from here to the plaza

before lifelong residents were displaced by property taxes…

 

and tourists

 

before Fridays became Thursdays

but we still say Friday is Friday

fuck that

 

before we felt like a puppet

was the most accurate way

to represent our country

to represent our lives

 

there was fire

 

since back when my Shoshone ancestors immolated themselves into rising smoke signals

in order to fly an S.O.S. and an apology to God

since back when flaming sacrifices to the sun were common

 

before mistakes became regrets

and before bad ideas became sins

 

there was the burn

and it is still burning down to the ground

right here, for the past 15 years

in the middle of the street

 

the last peace

of unpaved earth in Burque

 

an effigy

the size of our ego

stands un-alone

at the center of a circle of humanitarians

 

at the center of this circle of handheld hearts 

(that extends at least 5,941 mi in circumference)

is a fire

 

a fire

humans did not invent

but discovered

 

like the anxiety we no longer hide

instead ignite

we are bringing fire ecology back to save our planet

slash and burn gloom

one burn at a time

 

burn corporate greed

for buying all our seeds

 

burn the welfare for the rich

And all the bailouts they get

 

burn the excuses we feed our children

And the jobless future we sell them

 

burn BP and their climate hoax

while our entire watershed is engulfed

 

burn baby burn

for the survivalist

of the Mayan Apocalypse

 

(You’re Welcome)

 

we are the same fire

keeping the light on inside of us

 

consuming ourselves

to light the sky for others

 

and though this is a ceremony of forgetting something

forgetting anything

foregtting everything

 

may you always remember

how to burn…

 

 

© Hakim Bellamy September 6, 2013

Thanks to the fine folks at Oneheadlightink and the New Mexico Federation of Labor for putting me TO WORK…on tour…for Labor Day Weekend. 6 cities in 3 days New Mexico! Let’s go! All the events are free, so come on out!

Here is the schedule

Saturday August 31:
Las Cruces, New Mexico
12-2 PM
Young Park
1905 Nevada Ave.

Saturday August 31:
Truth or Consequences, New Mexico
7-9 PM
Grapes Gallery
407 Main Street

Sunday September 1:
Corrales, New Mexico
1-3 PM
Corrales Bistro Brewery
4908 Corrales Rd.

Sunday September 1:
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Albuquerque Street Festival Amherst and Central
Nob Hill, Albuquerque, New Mexico
5-9 PM

Amherst and Central
Monday September 2:
Santa Fe Street Festival
Santa Fe, New Mexico
12-3 PM
Taos Street
(Behind Santa Fe YouthWorks and the Center for Progress and Justice)

Monday September 2:
Taos, New Mexico
7-9 PM
Taos Mesa Brewing
20 ABC Mesa Rd.

 

Like the Salt of the Earth Tour Facebook Page!

And here’s the new poem (in the video)…in black and white.

Love in the time of Colliers* – by hakim bellamy

 

Laying down track for the westbound train

Stacking up timber in the state of Maine

Digging out coal in the West Virginia Hills

Hammerin’ Steel in the Pittsburgh Mills

Immigrants from Austria and Italy

Immigrants from Rega on the Baltic Sea

Green-eyed Slovacs

Blue-eyed Swedes

 

Irishmen from Limmerick

Englishmen from Leeds

6-day week

And a 12-hour day

And it’s welcome boys to the U.S.A.

Dollar a day

For a factory hand

And it’s “Welcome Ladies,

To The Promised Land!”

 

it must have been tough

building America

and being a songwriter

at the same time

 

it must have been hot

picking cotton

and singing concerts

underneath all those stage lights

and stars

 

when boss and business

only cared for what we could make

(including our offspring)

 

we nurtured what we create

 

whether slave or scab

union or underclass

even in submission

we script songs of survival

 

we sang God

in G-sharp

 

and since creation

is the highest form of flattery

we prayed with our arms

 

and we did it weld

hammered every metal sheet

into a Vera Mukhina masterpiece

 

we’ve been farm to table

since it was plantation to plate

with the sweat of Cesar Chavez

and the sweet of Jacques Torres

 

we are the flesh and bone fingers of the fashion industry

long before famine was “in”

when garment, textile and feast were bad words

we’d give you the shirt off our back

and then go make more

 

we are walking works of art

we are working walks of art

 

we are love in the time of Collier’s

in those mining towns

where everyone is as Black as my lungs

people fell in love

 

they drank

and partied

and danced

they made babies they knew

they’d die too soon for

 

the Land Lords

will shrug their shoulders at Ricardo

scratch their heads at our values

our theory of Labor,

Laughter and Life

 

they will screw their faces confused

at our ability to keep coming back

for more

knowing that they are out to get us

for less

 

they will not understand how we

make art

make beautiful

make love

below the line…

 

every line.

 

how we make movies

without wanting to be movie stars

how we make meals

without so much as a thank you

how we make graduates

without so much as a fuss

 

we are not that different

we are amazing

and will continue to produce “amazing”

with Pride

 

until they understand the difference

between a dollar and a dream

 

between a million

and what we deserve.

 © Hakim Bellamy August 29, 2013

*Colliers Lung (AKA Black Lung) is a common affliction of colliers or coal workers, hence the name. It is caused by prolonged exposure to coal dust particles or smoke that carbon accumulates in the lungs. The disease is often asymptomatic but may lead to more serious forms of the disease such as simple coal workers pneumoconiosis and complicated coal workers pneumoconiosis.

See you ‘round the way! - hb

My crew at Spoken Word Camp at Santa Fe School for the Arts & Sciences this summer. Poetry by Merit, Sina, Alicia, Nicholas & Annie (College Teaching Assistant) below. I MISS YOU GUYS!

Merit http://youtu.be/jIG8fzz25Yo

Sina http://youtu.be/XgpTaR1tsfU

Alicia http://youtu.be/fY7ea8GBQmg

Annie http://youtu.be/0h0doOHRQm4

Nicholas http://youtu.be/klrh-qMvq9w

And check out the team’s Ekphrastic Poetry Video too! They picked the pics and they poemed the poems.

http://youtu.be/hXngq5G0tRU

My crew at Spoken Word Camp at Santa Fe School for the Arts & Sciences this summer. Poetry by Merit, Sina, Alicia, Nicholas & Annie (College Teaching Assistant) below. I MISS YOU GUYS!

Merit http://youtu.be/jIG8fzz25Yo

Sina http://youtu.be/XgpTaR1tsfU

Alicia http://youtu.be/fY7ea8GBQmg

Annie http://youtu.be/0h0doOHRQm4

Nicholas http://youtu.be/klrh-qMvq9w

And check out the team’s Ekphrastic Poetry Video too! They picked the pics and they poemed the poems.

http://youtu.be/hXngq5G0tRU

From NY to NJ to NM … beats, bards & baked goods in Santa Fe
A night of poetry with a pair of world traveling hip hop scholars at the home of the Big Pun Waffle
for immediate release – What happens when you put together a native New Yorker with an affinity for baked goods (bordering on obsession) with a hip hop theater expert and a poet laureate? You have to go to Momo & Company at 5:30pm on Friday, May 24th to find out!
New York native Leslie Thompson is one-half of the genius behind Santa Fe’s only gluten-free bakery and Boba Tea bar. With a menu that is as entertaining as delicious, Leslie is known for flavoring the names of some of her lunch and menu breakfast items with her love for hip hop culture. Thompson’s relationship with hip hop is not limited to her naming of her newest breakfast item after the late, platinum selling, Latino, hip hop pioneer Big Punisher; she also is a good friend of renowned hip hop theater director, choreographer and scholar Daniel Banks, PhD.
A Santa Fe resident, Banks has served on the faculties of the Dept. of Undergraduate Drama, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, and is currently on the faculty of the M.A. In Applied Theatre at City University of NY. The co-founder of DNAWORKS and co-director of Theatre Without Borders, Banks has worked extensively in the U.S. and abroad, having directed at such notable venues as the National Theatre of Uganda (Kampala), the Belarussian National Drama Theatre (Minsk), The Market Theatre (Johannesburg, South Africa), the Hip Hop Theatre Festival (New York and Washington, D.C.), and the Oval House (London). Banks and Thompson had been conspiring to put literature in the air for some time at Momo & Co., however it would be the intersection of another Northeasterner that set their plan into action.
Banks met Hakim Bellamy in January of 2013, after years of hearing about each other’s shared interests in hip hop and theater in New Mexico. Shortly after Bellamy returned from South Africa, the two met at a Littleglobe Creative Transformation Workshop that Banks was co-facilitating. A Littleglobe affiliate and New Jersey native, Bellamy is also the inaugural poet laureate of Albuquerque. Weeks later, Banks and Bellamy met at Momo & Co. to become better acquainted. Out of that meeting, Bellamy, Banks and Thompson decided to bring every “New” state except for New Hampshire together.
On Saturday, May 25th at 5:30pm Momo & Co. will host a reading of the two authors in Santa Fe. The reading is free to all those who attend and the bakery will remain open with Thompson’s addictive, yet gluten-free confections for sale. Banks and Bellamy will also be signing books underneath the New York City subway signs that adorn the bakery walls. Though Banks will be reading poetry from his soon to be published collection Shades, he will have copies on hand of his recently released Hip Hop Theatre anthology titled Say Word!: Voices from Hip Hop Theater for the University of Michigan Press (available in Santa Fe at Garcia Street Books). Bellamy will read from his new book, SWEAR, by West End Press and distributed by University of New Mexico Press (available in Santa Fe at Collected Works). Both men will host a Q&A and book signing after the free reading.
A week ago, CakeSpy Undercover (ireallylikefood.com) “secret-shopped” Momo & Co. and reported: “While eating gluten-free may be a necessity to some, it need not equal suffering – for anyone. So it makes me so glad places like Momo and Company exist.”
Bellamy, Banks and Thompson feel the same way about poetry. No suffering needed.
###
contact Banks (daniel@dnaworks.org) & Bellamy (tirods@gmail.com) for Interviews & Inquiries

From NY to NJ to NM … beats, bards & baked goods in Santa Fe

A night of poetry with a pair of world traveling hip hop scholars at the home of the Big Pun Waffle

for immediate release – What happens when you put together a native New Yorker with an affinity for baked goods (bordering on obsession) with a hip hop theater expert and a poet laureate? You have to go to Momo & Company at 5:30pm on Friday, May 24th to find out!

New York native Leslie Thompson is one-half of the genius behind Santa Fe’s only gluten-free bakery and Boba Tea bar. With a menu that is as entertaining as delicious, Leslie is known for flavoring the names of some of her lunch and menu breakfast items with her love for hip hop culture. Thompson’s relationship with hip hop is not limited to her naming of her newest breakfast item after the late, platinum selling, Latino, hip hop pioneer Big Punisher; she also is a good friend of renowned hip hop theater director, choreographer and scholar Daniel Banks, PhD.

A Santa Fe resident, Banks has served on the faculties of the Dept. of Undergraduate Drama, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, and is currently on the faculty of the M.A. In Applied Theatre at City University of NY. The co-founder of DNAWORKS and co-director of Theatre Without Borders, Banks has worked extensively in the U.S. and abroad, having directed at such notable venues as the National Theatre of Uganda (Kampala), the Belarussian National Drama Theatre (Minsk), The Market Theatre (Johannesburg, South Africa), the Hip Hop Theatre Festival (New York and Washington, D.C.), and the Oval House (London). Banks and Thompson had been conspiring to put literature in the air for some time at Momo & Co., however it would be the intersection of another Northeasterner that set their plan into action.

Banks met Hakim Bellamy in January of 2013, after years of hearing about each other’s shared interests in hip hop and theater in New Mexico. Shortly after Bellamy returned from South Africa, the two met at a Littleglobe Creative Transformation Workshop that Banks was co-facilitating. A Littleglobe affiliate and New Jersey native, Bellamy is also the inaugural poet laureate of Albuquerque. Weeks later, Banks and Bellamy met at Momo & Co. to become better acquainted. Out of that meeting, Bellamy, Banks and Thompson decided to bring every “New” state except for New Hampshire together.

On Saturday, May 25th at 5:30pm Momo & Co. will host a reading of the two authors in Santa Fe. The reading is free to all those who attend and the bakery will remain open with Thompson’s addictive, yet gluten-free confections for sale. Banks and Bellamy will also be signing books underneath the New York City subway signs that adorn the bakery walls. Though Banks will be reading poetry from his soon to be published collection Shades, he will have copies on hand of his recently released Hip Hop Theatre anthology titled Say Word!: Voices from Hip Hop Theater for the University of Michigan Press (available in Santa Fe at Garcia Street Books). Bellamy will read from his new book, SWEAR, by West End Press and distributed by University of New Mexico Press (available in Santa Fe at Collected Works). Both men will host a Q&A and book signing after the free reading.

A week ago, CakeSpy Undercover (ireallylikefood.com) “secret-shopped” Momo & Co. and reported: “While eating gluten-free may be a necessity to some, it need not equal suffering – for anyone. So it makes me so glad places like Momo and Company exist.”

Bellamy, Banks and Thompson feel the same way about poetry. No suffering needed.

###

contact Banks (daniel@dnaworks.org) & Bellamy (tirods@gmail.com) for Interviews & Inquiries

New event added to my schedule. You won’t find this under the “What’s Next?” tab. I get to introduce my sister Jessica Helen Lopez, who gets to interview Jimmy Santiago Baca, AND YOU GET TO WATCH IT!

Get your tickets here at www.KiMoTickets.com or call 505.886.1251 to order by phone.

Reserve Seats: Adults-$10 Seniors-$8 Students-$5